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IrelandDonegalMalin HeadCrega Cottage - Malin Head, Donegal

€250 / week
€60.00 17th Nov 17

Crega Cottage - Malin Head, Donegal

1 bed Cottage Refreshed on Jan 21, 2020
#14 of 20 Properties Viewed in Malin Head
Donegal Holiday Cottages
Donegal Holiday Cottages
Tel: 0044 287 135 6080
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Description

Crega Cottage is nestled in spectacular coastal countryside close to Ireland's most northerly point, Malin Head. It is especially suitable for individuals, couples and smaller groups of up to 3. The cottage is fully wheelchair accessible, with purpose built shower room and wide entrance doors. The area has a selection of pubs – Crossroads Inn, Most Northerly Bar – Farrens, Doherty’s, Seaview Tavern and Restaurant. It is close to the area where Star Wars was filmed in 2016. The cottage has free wifi. The beach and fishing harbour at Portmor are also close by as is the Seaview Tavern, incorporating shop, restaurant, traditional and modern pubs. Nearby attractions include horse riding at Malin, golf at Ballyliffin and the Famine Village at Isle of Doagh. Local Activities Activities include; Hill Walking, Scuba-diving, Surfing, Golf, Fishing, Bird watching. For the golf enthusiast, the well known Ballyliffin Golf Club and course is a half hour drive from here. Other golf courses are located at Greencastle, Redcastle and Buncrana.  Wild Atlantic Way The "Inishowen 100" is a drive which takes the visitor on a roughly circular tour of the Inishowen Peninsula, and gets its name from the distance of 100kms, the approximate distance covered if the whole trip is completed. Near Ballyliffin (and the golf course) on the beautiful Isle of Doagh, a visit to the Isle Of Doagh Visitor Centre is to be recommended. This unique outdoor museum tells the story of life in this area going back to the Great Famine in the 1840's. A Famine Village and typical dwellings such as Sod or Turf houses from those times can be seen here. The Irish Famine was at its worst between 1845 to 1848 causing the population to drop from 8 to 4 million through death and emigration.